Category: Equilibrium & Sustainability

California must retire gas-guzzling trucks to meet 2045 emissions targets: Study

California must retire existing heavy-duty trucks to meet the state’s 2045 carbon neutrality goals, in addition to promoting the purchase of zero-emissions vehicles (ZEVs), a new study has found. Stricter policies that cover both the rollout of zero-emissions trucks and the early retirement of gas-guzzlers could slash cumulative greenhouse gas emissions by 64 percent, according to the study, published on Monday in Environmental Research: Infrastructure and…

California advances first-in-nation plan to set water budgets for cities statewide

California officials have approved a first-of-its-kind regulation that will set long-term limits on the amounts of water the state’s urban utilities can use on an annual basis. The State Water Resources Control Board granted unanimous support Wednesday to sweeping conservation measures that are expected to generate about 500,000 acre-feet in water savings each year by 2040. The quantity conserved is enough to quench the thirst…

Half the water flowing from US rivers is at risk of pollution due to lax federal regulation: Study

About 55 percent of the water emanating from U.S. rivers is vulnerable to pollution, due to their lack of protections under the Clean Water Act, a new study has found. The Supreme Court last year ruled that “ephemeral streams” — those that fill up and flow only after weather events — do not fall under the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act, the authors noted….

Bill Nye says extreme weather, record heat is ‘beginning of the new normal’ 

Science educator Bill Nye said that extreme weather and record-breaking heat can be the start of a “new normal.” Nye made an appearance on ABC’s “This Week” to discuss the latest heat wave that has blistered many parts of the United States in recent days. Host Martha Raddatz asked if this sort of heat may become the “new normal.” “It’s the beginning of the new…

How Texas unleashed a geothermal boom

With its nation-leading renewables fleet and oil and gas industry, Texas is poised to dominate what boosters hope will be America’s next great energy boom: a push to tap the heat of the subterranean earth for electricity and industry. That technology, known as geothermal energy, has demonstrated the rare ability to unite the state’s warring political camps — and is fueling a boom in startups…